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Park and Pay Stations - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Can I get a payment extension?
  2. Do you accept Credit Cards?
  3. I have an overdue citation. Will my car get booted or towed away?
  4. I paid for my citation at the DMV. Why did I get another late notice?
  5. I was told that it was too late to contest my citation. Who can I make an appeal to?
  6. My car is booted, how can I get the boot off?
  7. Can I be arrested if I don't pay for my citation?
  8. Can I do community service instead of paying the fine?
  9. I can't afford to pay this citation. Can I have it cancelled?
  10. I sold this car. Why am I getting citations in the mail?
  11. Do I need to pay my citation in order to contest?
  12. Can I Park Here?

1. Can I get a payment extension?

The Parking Violation Bureau does not grant payment extensions. A payment must be received within 21 days of the date the citation was issued, or 14 days from the date of the first overdue notice. Otherwise, late fees will be added, which often double the citation fine. Additional collections fees will be added if the citation remains unpaid after the initial late penalty is assessed.

2. Do you accept Credit Cards?

Yes, Visa or Mastercard credit card payment can be made online or via telephone by calling our Customer Service Hotline. Additionally, credit and debit card payments are accepted at all four of our customer service center locations: Van Nuys, West Los Angeles, Downtown, and Mid-Wilshire. Information about credit card payments, as well as a list of hotline numbers.

3. I have an overdue citation. Will my car get booted or towed away?

Your vehicle will only become eligible to be booted or towed if the vehicle has five or more delinquent citations. If your vehicle is in danger of being booted or towed, you should pay your citations immediately. Click on the following link for a description of different payment options: Payment

If you have fewer than five delinquent citations, your vehicle will not be booted or towed. However, a hold will be placed on your annual Vehicle Registration until the citations are paid.

4. I paid for my citation at the DMV. Why did I get another late notice?

There is a significant delay (often 30-60 days) between the time a payment is made at the DMV and the time that the Parking Violations Bureau is notified of the payment. If you paid at the DMV, you can ignore the late notices, or bring your itemized DMV receipt to one of our Customer Service Centers.

5. I was told that it was too late to contest my citation. Who can I make an appeal to?

Citations must be contested within 21 days of the date the citation is issued, or 14 days of the date of the first overdue notice. Once that period of time has expired, you lose your statutory right to contest that citation. There is no appeal. There are two exceptions to this rule. If you are contesting your citation on the grounds that the vehicle no longer belonged to you at the time the citation was issued, or the sole registered owner of the vehicle is now deceased, you have an unlimited period of time to request an Initial Review. Information on how to contest a citation.

6. My car is booted, how can I get the boot off?

Vehicles are booted because they have five or more unpaid, overdue parking citations. You must pay all fines and late fines, as well as a $150.00 boot fee, in order to have the boot removed. You must also provide proof that the vehicle has current registration. Information about retrieving a booted vehicle.

7. Can I be arrested if I don't pay for my citation?

No. Parking citations are not criminal violations in California. This means that you will not be arrested for failure to pay parking citations. However, there are substantial penalties for unpaid parking citations. Late fees can more than double the original citation amount. You will be unable to register your vehicle until the overdue citations are paid. You also run the risk of having your vehicle booted or towed if you accumulate five or more overdue citations. In addition, your income tax refund could be withheld to pay parking citation fines.

8. Can I do community service instead of paying the fine?

Motorists who are homeless may be able to perform community service instead of paying parking citation fines as part of a program called CAPP. For motorists who are not homeless, there is no alternative to payment of the fine. For more information on performing community service in lieu of paying the fine, please call 213-978-4400.

9. I can't afford to pay this citation. Can I have it cancelled?

No. Parking citations cannot be cancelled due to an inability to pay.

10. I sold this car. Why am I getting citations in the mail?

If you were the registered owner at the time the citation was issued, than you are responsible for the citation. When you sell a vehicle, you are responsible for notifying the DMV that the vehicle is no longer in your possession, and for providing the DMV with the name and address of the new owner. If you continue to receive parking citations for this vehicle, it is probably because the DMV still has your name on record as the legal owner. You must go to the DMV and fill out a Release of Liability. Once you have done so, you must also fill out a Declaration of Non-Ownership form, submit the documentation as listed on the form, and send it to the Parking Violations Bureau at the following address:

Parking Violations Bureau
P.O. Box 30247
Los Angeles, CA 90030

You will find a Declaration of Non-Ownership on the back of each notice sent to you through the mail. You may also download a copy of the Declaration of Non-Ownership from this website.

11. Do I need to pay my citation in order to contest?

No, You are not required to pay your citation in order to contest. However, per section 40204 of the California Vehicle Code, if you pay your citation without contesting at the same time, the citation will be considered closed and you will not be able to contest your citation.